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How To Spot an Agent!

Sounds like Berean TV, the Yap Gang, The Orthodox Moor, Abu, Blactastic and Tzibiyah!


Here are some of the common tactics agents use that you can look for:

1) Lower level Agents, usually Level 1, will engage in combative language, argue with other members, derail topics, routinely go off-topic and otherwise bring toxicity and negativity to the group. They are easy to spot and usually banned fairly quickly.

2) Higher level operators, between Level 2 and 3, use more sophisticated tactics. They will remain in a group for some time and appear neutral or mildly supportive, then their tone will change to more skeptical questions and criticisms.

This is intended to sway other people who may be “on the fence” about a certain topic. Observers may say, “That guy has been in here a long time and he seemed supportive, but now he isn’t. That must mean something. Maybe I shouldn’t support this, either.” This is the intended effect of this tactic.

3) Agents will engage in manipulative and fallacious argumentative tactics, such as bad faith arguments and straw man arguments. This is discussed more in Intel Drop #4. Here is a detailed list of fallacious arguments, and here is a more basic introduction. The agents are well-trained in the use of these fallacious arguments because they can be incredibly persuasive over the untrained mind.

4) Agents will simply lie about your position, or make up completely false accusations to slander or defame any given group or movement. This is why it is important to verify claims you read on the Internet. Always check your sources to be sure they are legitimate. We have already had to deal with multiple lies, including many agents who falsely claimed we were “selling” or promoting a crypto coin.

5) Agents are known to create fake accounts to mimic the leader of a group. Bill Sweet has already exposed one who was trying to contact other people. Another agent created a Twitter claiming to represent us, and even posted very poorly made “screenshots” claiming they came from our whistle blowers. These tactics are designed to muddle, distract and discredit any given movement they are targeting.

It’s important to note that not everyone who uses the above tactics is an agent. Agents are simply mimicking behaviours that are disruptive or corrosive. Normal people engage in these behaviours as well, and it is a natural consequence of having large, open public debates or discussions.

The danger the agent poses is their skill level and exaggerated presence in any given group. While one group may have a handful of naturally toxic or disruptive people, a paid agent only enhances that disruption. As such, an agent is not a natural or normal occurrence in public debate; they are an exaggeration of a small, present element in all public debates.

Being aware of agent activity can better help you understand who you are speaking with, and whether or not you are being manipulated.

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